RideLogic Bike Setup System

Hi everyone!

I hope you find this interesting and helpful. If you have questions or comments, please post them in the comments fields below or on our Facebook group.

Lee


Quick-start guide NEW

RideLogic™  bike setup system: Intro

The RideLogic™ approach is simple, powerful and works for all bikes that are meant to be Ridden with a capital R: BMX, dirt jump, XC, trail, enduro, downhill and even motocross

Become one with your bike: About the RideLogic™ bike setup system

Transcend the conventional wisdom about cockpit setup

Step by step instructions: the easy way and the thorough way

Let’s talk handlebars

Historically they were too narrow. Fashionably they’re too wide. How to pick your perfect handlebar.

Handlebar width made easy: Dial in your handlebar width with RideLogic™

Calculate your ideal bar width: based on your body, not trends

Fine-tune your handlebar width: narrower is healthier than wider

Adjust your hand width for different situations: your grips are pretty wide

Handlebar setback: the unknown measurement

Setbacks for various handlebars

Handlebar sweep: Small changes can make big improvements

Bar-ins: the new bar ends: you know you love it

Dial in your cockpit for Riding (capital R) 

The RideLogic™ approach is based on the relationship between your hands and feet, your grips and pedals.

Rider Area Distance (RAD): the most important measurement

Getting RAD with RipRow: How to use the training tool as a setup tool. It’s insanely easy.

How to measure your bike’s RAD: All you need is a string and a tape measure.

RideLogic™ on-bike check: you won’t believe how easy this is

Rider Area Angle in Degrees (RAAD): tweaking your setup to fit your riding style

How to adjust your cockpit: hint: get a shorter stem 🙂

Understand stems and bars: how they affect your cockpit

Handlebar <> saddle position: Should your grips be even with, above or below your saddle?

New bike? Make informed decisions.

Stop wasting time and money with the wrong frame and components. Buy the perfect bike and set it up just right for you.

Know your RAD, reach and rise: the three critical shred measurements

Compare frames the smart way: ignore the size charts

Understand stems and bars: how they affect your cockpit

Handlebar <> saddle position: Should your grips be even with, above or below your saddle?

Easy ways to choose your next frame size: All you need is your height or RAD NEW AND SWEET

Pick the perfect MTB frame size for you: A very simple approach (old but interesting)

Pick the perfect frame size: save major disappointment and thousands of dollars (this lesson is old, but it has some good info)

RideLogic™ Rider and Bike Calculator: make your body and bike fit each other perfectly before you buy

SHO : Steering/Hands Offset

How far are your hands in front of or behind your bike’s steering axis?

This measurement helps explain why some bikes handle so well — and it helps you make your bike handle well.

SHO : Steering/Hands Offset

Bike sizing charts NEW

Every bike maker publishes height/size charts for their bikes, but a lot of those seem to be based on old logic; the bikes have gotten longer, but people haven’t. Our charts use the RideLogic bike setup method. We hope they help you choose bikes that fit you well.

Check out the bike sizing charts >>> 

Look at this too:

Easy ways to choose your next frame size

Deviating from RAD NEW

I think a neutral RAD (bike and body matching each other) is ideal for most people in most places. However, bike setup exists on a continuum, and deviating from RAD can have its benefits.

Deviating from RAD

Riding RAD+

Riding RAD-

The Magic Triangle of MTB fit NEW

Here’s a simple way to set up your bike. It incorporates seat height, seat tube angle, RAD, RAAD and seat-bar position. Check it out:

The Magic Triangle of MTB fit 

Magic Triangle – EZ version – less measuring

Adjusting your Magic Triangle for your proportions and riding style

57 replies
    • s0ckeyeus
      s0ckeyeus says:

      Lee,
      If you’re running Chrome, download the “Check My Links” extension. If you run this on the page, it will color code links that do or do not work. Right now, it’s telling me there are 7 invalid links, all related to the “Transcend the conventional wisdom about cockpit setup” article.

      Joel

      Reply
  1. Holger Baer
    Holger Baer says:

    Hi Lee,
    The link “transcend the conventional wisdom…” is still not working for me. 🙁
    Thanks!
    Holger

    Reply
  2. nutritionnicole
    nutritionnicole says:

    Buy a LLB Bikefit and it will BLOW YOUR MIND that you have LIKELY been riding the WRONG BIKE. I’ve been riding for 15 years and now that my RAD is set properly my bike full complements and takes my Kung-fu skills all the way to 11. You will be instantly AMAZED at how incredibly well your bike rips when set-up perfectly. DISCLAIMER: DON’T BUY A BIKE WITHOUT THIS FIT ASSESSMENT BRCAUSE THE WRONG FRAME IS LIKELY IN YOUR FUTURE!!!

    Reply
  3. john farr
    john farr says:

    Lee,
    My XL devinci django fit almost like a glove with factory setup at 1.5 class at erie with kevin without any adjustments (fairly rare i guess) and a pleasant surprise.
    Reach is 480 stack is 620, HA 67.5deg. My question is in looking at possubly adding a downhill bike to arsenal the reaches on xl frames from specialized, transition, giant, etc all are noticeably shorter. Is this by design for the function of bike? Does the RAD measurement and quick check for range of motion/extension of arms with packed shoulders on picnic tables still apply to a downhill style bike?
    John

    Thanks
    John

    Reply
  4. john farr
    john farr says:

    To add to above, say on a transition tr500 I’d have to add approx 35mm to a 50mm stock stem to mimic my reach, and is that getting too long at 85mm for ideal control??
    Or am I completely missing something…. Which is likely.

    Reply
  5. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    John,

    It is very unusual that a stock bike fits perfect. Very unusual. Very cool too.

    You can check your DH bike fit the same way you check your trail bike.

    The RAD should be the same on all of your bikes.

    On your DH bike, you might prefer a higher RAAD, which brings the bars closer and higher. This usually improves handling on DH terrain, and that’s why downhill bikes often have shorter reaches than trail bikes.

    I hope that helps,

    Lee

    Reply
  6. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    Hey!

    I apologize for the issue. I installed a new plugin, and this was the unexpected side effect.

    Everything should work now. Please let me know if it doesn’t.

    Lee

    Reply
  7. AzRider
    AzRider says:

    Lee,
    I am in the market for my first FS and have always struggled to find a bike that fits.

    Can you comment on why your RAD philosophy seems to differ from several bike manufacturers I am currently talking to?

    First off… your theory on RAD seems obvious to me, the logic seems sound. My current XXL Fuse (3″riser, 810 bar, 30* 70mm stem) has a RAD that’s about and 1″ too long. But, it generally feels like it rides good. I’m 6’5″ with long arms and legs and short torso.

    As I research several bikes, I find your system places me on XL bikes from the likes of Specialized and Santa Cruze who’s sizing charts clearly put me on a XXL. Other companies, such as Guerrilla Gravity, I’m on a Large versus the XL that is claimed for 6’4 to 6’8″ riders.

    Am I missing something in the calculator or are these manufactures just building bikes that are way too big (in your opinion of course)? Unless you have already done so, a blog post on this topic with your thoughts would be really interesting!

    Thanks in advance for your comments!

    Reply
  8. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    Hey there,

    A blog post is a great idea. Right now I’m writing the RideLogic™ bike setup system (RAD, RAAD and all) into a book.

    You’re right: My approach varies from pretty much everyone’s. Keep in mind I have very specific ideas about how the human body is supposed to operate and how to best help your body relate with your bike. If you have a different riding style, or perhaps physical limitations that prevent you from moving properly, you might not “get” what I’m doing.

    Since you asked me, and this is my site, I’ll tell you what I think:

    The rest of the bike industry is missing something huge. They are driven by a foolish combination of tradition and trends, and not a single person in the bike industry who I’ve talked to (and I’ve talked to some!) has any real idea how a bike and body should relate with each other when it comes to shredding.

    I’m a decently smart, creative and driven person, and I’ve put a ton of time, effort and testing into the RideLogic™ setup system. I’ve seen it work in person with hundreds of people (wait, I coached 700 last year, so that’s more like thousands), and many more online. My approach works. Try it. If you don’t like it, you can always switch to something else.

    And the follow-on:

    Over recent model years, bike reaches have gotten way longer. Humans and the physical laws that govern their movement have not changed. Either bikes finally fit everyone! Or the pendulum is swinging too far.

    I hope that helps,

    Lee

    Reply
    • AzRider
      AzRider says:

      Thanks for the reply Lee.

      One more question. What are your thoughts on saddle height relative to cockpit? (i.e. Should handlebars be level with saddle plus or minus some dimension?)

      Reply
  9. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    I believe seat position and handlebar position should be independent adjustments.

    Depending on your RAAD, the bar height will likely be near you seat height, but that’s not a goal.

    Reply
  10. Bassplayer456
    Bassplayer456 says:

    The on-bike fit check has totally transformed by bikes’ geometry (much shorter stems and lower stacks), and after adaptation, I’m so into it!!! Question though: the “half stack” measurement drawing on the site shows the measurement taken at a 90deg angle from horizontal, versus taking it following the head tube’s angle. So, the measurements are way smaller than what my bikes’ actual measurements are (when I measure along the head tube angle)… just asking since that’s the only measurement I’m not sure of when using the ride logic calculator… thanks!

    Reply
  11. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    Bassplayer456,

    Thank you for the brilliant question.

    When you enter the half stack number into the calculator, enter it as measured along your steering axis. A 10mm spacer would be 10mm. Half of a stem that’s 40mm tall would be 20mm. The magic trigonometry machine will adjust for your head angle.

    Awesome question.

    Lee

    Reply
    • Bassplayer456
      Bassplayer456 says:

      Super, thanks!!! That is a great calculator by the way… I am so lucky my frame ended up perfect (just switched stem from 60 to 40 based on the calculator, and the on bike fit was perfect!!!) and my buddies are all wondering where all my shred came from all of a sudden!!! Hehehe!

      Reply
  12. benconnor
    benconnor says:

    Hey there Lee,
    Great system. Measured myself and my bike and whaddayaknow, pretty damn close. About 8mm less reach would put me bang on the All Mountain / Enduro settings.

    So, about that 8mm. I figure I can get it with some bars with more back sweep, which is something I’d like to do anyway. But here’s the thing: when I run the string between the grips in my current setup, it pretty much crosses the center of the steerer tube. Coming back any further is going to put my hands behind the steerer.

    Do I go for it, or am I asking for some funky steering behaviour if I cross the magic line?

    Thanks in advance for your thoughts,
    Ben

    Reply
  13. Lee McCormack
    Lee McCormack says:

    Ben!

    My Enduro Coil has an SQlab 30X bar, which brings my hands well behind the steering axis, and THAT BIKE RIPS!!

    Lots of motorcycles are the same way.

    Don’t be afraid.

    Lee

    Reply
  14. jhmacmah
    jhmacmah says:

    Hi Lee,

    I am not sure which forum this belongs in, but I have an interesting question about bike size and fit and body response. It has been great the recent conversations by you and SteveM on Pinkbike, etc.

    I like to geek on numbers as well and I have a spreadsheet of bike geometries that normalize reach to constant stack, played with hypothenuse some time ago with respect to bike fitting. I find it interesting to think about. However, I also use these numbers to help evaluate what I experience on the trail, especially as bikes have gotten longer. I have always been one to gravitate toward smaller geometry bikes based on feel. Only to find in time that I do enjoy the longer geometry (so-called modern respectively). I had an amazing bike that I have ridden for some time and enjoyed its modern geometry. It turns out this bike matches your recommendations.

    A few months ago, I went with a much new bike with even longer geometry. I was surprised that I could ride such a longer bike and appreciated a number of its handling characteristics and bigger wheels. I even more surprised given my tendencies toward smaller geometry. As with any new bike, there is a break-in and adjustment period. After some time, I learned what I liked and didn’t.

    I appreciated the longer geometry in jumping, confidence, stability, and most importantly climbing and pedaling. One thing that I recognized was that my lower back no longer ached. I love to jump mountain bikes, but I have to limit my sessioning because of my back. With the longer bike, I could jump hours and day after day with no issue. With my previous bike, I had to keep a careful eye on this.

    One major issue that I didn’t find overly fun was cornering with the longer bike. I struggled, not on all corners, but with the key corners where you can separate from your friends. I found that I lost my edge.

    Based on the internet chatter and my enjoyment of exploring, I purchased a smaller frame. I instantly learned that corners were a breeze with the smaller bike. It brought back a lot of fun.

    In return, my back issues resumed. Now I recognize that with the smaller bike I am using my legs a lot more and have less weight on the bars. With the longer bike my hands would hurt, though not with smaller bike.

    One aspect of this is fit…what’s a better a sore back or sore hands? I feel this is an out of the saddle issue, because of how I feel when jumping. It seems my arms are relieving my back issues.

    I welcome your thoughts on this.

    Best,
    Jamie

    Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Jamie,

      Neither a sore back nor sore hands is OK.

      They both speak to low core engagement and improper balance: either too for forward or back.

      Around here we believe you should always balance on your feet. The notion that a longer bike shifts weight forward is hooey — it only happens if you bring your weight forward, or dumbly allow your weight to shift forward. Sorry for the strong language, but that’s the deal.

      Balance on your feet. Engage your core. Make the necessary angles with the bars.

      If you can’t ride as much as you want, do some RipRowing. That’ll fix both strength and technique.

      Make sense?

      Lee

      Reply
      • jhmacmah
        jhmacmah says:

        Thanks Lee!!!

        Yes makes sense – a lot of sense! It all clicked with this response and reading more of your website. I practiced last night in front of the house using more core and legs and today I applied on the trail – wow – its like cheating! Considering the recent rain (ie not going through puddles) and focusing on my form, I nearly PRed all of my DH times and it felt very easy and relaxed. Mind boggling! I am excited to continue!

        Best,
        Jamie

        Reply
        • jhmacmah
          jhmacmah says:

          FYI…Also amazing the marketing propaganda of a longer bike requires more aggressive stance, which I bought into. What I found with my tinkering over the holidays and your advice is that with a smaller bike you can compensate easier with bad form, which I have been doing. With a longer bike, bad form rears its ugly head quicker. This is what I was fighting with – bad form that originated from reading too many bike reviews.

          Reply
        • Lee McCormack
          Lee McCormack says:

          CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!

          There has to be a kernel of truth in this new geometry, but I do think it’s gone too far and quickly become dogma.

          Reply
  15. Berend
    Berend says:

    Hi Lee,

    In my youth i have been involved with a motorcycle accident which resulted in a busted knee and limited range of motion in my left leg (i can ben my leg about 80-90 degrees, depending on the weather :)). Doing sports, riding bikes and so on all became rather problematic. After many years without much physical activity i decided to become more active again and looked into ways of enjoying sports with my handicap. I don’t know exactly why but i ended up with mountain biking (perhaps because i’ve always been a bit of thrill seeker)…

    Anyway, with my limited range of motion in my left leg its not possible to pedal a “regular” bike, changes had to be made to the bike to make that work. After doing quite a bit of research, experimenting and talking to a pro cycling mechanic i figured that short cranks were the way to go forward. I’ve had a shop machine down a Shimano Zee crankset all the way down to 115mm, almost 33% shorter then most other “standard” cranks! With these super short cranks i was able to pedal quite well, now the rest of my trail bike (Vitus Escarpe XL 2017) had to be dialed in. Thats when i stumbled upon your work and i’ve been very impressed with that. Your approach makes sense and feels right! It reminded my very much of the years that i’ve been practising Aikido, balance and physics play a huge role in that (as you also describe).

    Using RideLogic i’ve been able to dial in my cockpit that’s now spot on, and it feels/works awesome! Now i’m struggling with the position of my seat. With the short cranks my seat needs to be raised by a lot and at thus also moved back quite a bit. This shifts my weight up and to the back while seated and less room to move when the seat is dropped (dropper post). I still have some room for adjustments, the seat is now in a neutral position on the rails so it can be moved forwards but then it becomes even higher or moved back but lower. In both cases it limits my room to move in a direction, the neutral position is in my opinion the best compromise. Given this choice, what would you do?

    Lastly, i was hoping that you might have some advice where to look for techniques that i can use to get the most out of my bike handling when there’s limited room to move around the bike. Any knowledge you might be able to share that might help me further on this?

    Thanks so far!

    Berend (The Netherlands, Europe)

    Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Berend,

      Thank you for writing in. I’m stoked you found a way to enjoy mountain biking. I enjoy it too.

      1) I can say a lot more if I watch you ride in person. A neutral seat position sounds good unless you have a reason to move it.

      2) You need to develop a perfect hip hinge and low riding position. This will give you the range of motion you need to make your bike do what you want to do. The skills section of this site is full of tips and lessons.

      Have fun! Feel free to post a link to a video of you riding.

      Lee

      Reply
  16. nirradLikesBikes
    nirradLikesBikes says:

    Hi Lee,

    Wasn’t sure if to discuss here or on the Facebook posting with the YouTube video of “Cris Akrigg – Crossroads”

    I’m looking into the whole Gravel bike market and thinking through mentally which drop bar hand position would be ideal for measuring RAD or even if I should and approach more traditional bike fit, what ever that means. I believe you have mentioned at times that on your tour bike, you went with the hoods, reason being (I think) that is were you ride the largest percentage of time.

    I suspect you have done most of your tour bike riding, (lol with rocks and hill repeats), on paved surfaces. How has this translated to bumpy/gravel dirt and pumping at parks (Valmont) etc and your personal shoulder pain and comfort?

    A fun question, have you done this or heard of others that have mounted a drop bar on the RipRow? LOL I may check craigslist for a used bar and do this some day.

    Darrin

    Reply
    • nirradLikesBikes
      nirradLikesBikes says:

      Background info to add to my questions in the post.

      I’ve done a traditional bike fit with my road bike and have ridden dirt you’ll recognize, Bow Mountain, Poorman, Chapman etc. while on my road bike I’ll be on the hoods for the climbs with bent elbows and hands, I think is proper/correct, to the side, keeping the weight off the nerves. For descending I’m in the drops and feel most comfortable for both control and (rim) brake reach/power.

      Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Darrin!

      These days I think a drop bar bike’s RAD should fit in the drops. That’s where the most aggressive descending happens. In the Akrigg video take a look. It seems he uses the hoods for upward and the drops for downward.

      https://youtu.be/LB–HCRr8iU

      My AWOL is set like this – RAD in the drops – and it rips —> even on the small dirt jumps.

      Reply
  17. bnmelton
    bnmelton says:

    Lee,

    RideLogic, et. al. fit materials are awesome! Thanks for making riding more fun and the world a better place. Like everyone else who discovers it, I sure wish I’d had it when I was buying my last bikes.

    I’ve tried my best to look hard and not be lazy before I posted, but I can’t figure out the following.

    1. RAAD for Hardtails – I have a Hightower and Chameleon. When I sit on the HT and sag the suspension, I figure everything drops toward the ground the relatively the same and thus the RAAD stays about the same. However, when I sit on the Chameleon, front end drops something like 20-25mm (130mm fork with sag and nonvertical path of fork compression) while the rear doesn’t move, which should decrease RAAD. Do I need to worry about this? Should hardtails have slightly higher RAADs so that they ride similarly to a full suspension? If so, how many degrees would you aim for?

    2. Installing Bars – How do you set the rotation of the bars when you install in the stem. I know we don’t rotate the bars to manipulate reach and stack. Just try to get the logo forward in a neutral position? Do what feels most comfortable to my wrists?

    3. Really Long Arms and Weird RAD Results: I’ve done the generic and custom-data cockpit calculators for RAD. I get 83.1 using the generic/average numbers. I get 81.9 using custom. This may be within the margin of error for all the custom measurements, but makes some sense because I have very long arms. HOWEVER, when I use my RipRow I get 84cm (with pedals) or even close to 85cm (without pedals), which makes no sense to me given my very long arms. I’ve looked at the instructions over-and-over (I am measuring 1cm below the string) and done it several times, but keep getting the same results. My Hightower also seems to be good on in the on-the-bike test, and it measures 84cm. I want to trust myself and use 84cm, but with my very long arms I am scared to trust a number that is larger than the average, because common sense tells me it should be below the average. I do have long legs as well (itty, bitty torso), but compared to normal body proportions my arms are longer than my legs. I am just over 6’1″ (185cm) and have a wingspan of just over 6’5″ (197cm); ape index of 1.06. I have been down that rabbit hole on previous fits. Sorry for the long paragraph, but before I start buying stems, etc. I was wondering if you had any thoughts. I’m thinking split the baby and aim for 83 to 83.5?

    Many thanks!!!

    Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Hi!

      1. I wouldn’t worry about it (RAD is way more important than RAAD). That said, given that much sag, you can add one degree to your desired RAAD. 59° unsagged would be about 58° sagged.

      I can’t give you a RAAD target to aim for without knowing you or your bike. If you need a number … 58°.

      2. Do what’s comfortable. That said,

      A) Most bars have marks on the front that indicate their neutral install angle.

      B) I like a very slight amount (3-4°) of upsweep.

      3. The RipRow measurement is more accurate than the calculators.

      A) Make sure you’re getting a solid RipRow measurement. Pack your shoulders down. Keep your arms straight. Punch your fists downward.

      B) Assuming you’ve been doing this right, it sounds like 84cm is your RAD number. Keep in mind, RAD is influenced by leg length, arm length and torso length. Yeah, if you’re getting a solid RipRow measurement, go with that.

      I hope this helps!

      Lee

      Reply
  18. Stefan Tobler
    Stefan Tobler says:

    Hi Lee

    Would you say it matters how you get your perfect set-up? I mean if I would need kind of an extreme Bar with 60mm Rise, or if I put in a lot of spacers to increase half-stack in order to dial my RAD – is this a different feeling/handling to an already well balanced frame where I just need “average” kind of adjustments to get my RAD? Or is this negligible for a non-pro rider?

    Thanks
    Stef

    Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Hi Stefan,

      ANSWER 1

      It doesn’t really matter.

      As long as your bike’s RAD matches your body, you’re good to go.

      ANSWER 2

      It matters a bit.

      When you increase bar rise, the grips go upward.

      When you add spacers under the stem, the grips go upward and backward (because they’re following the steering axis).

      So increasing bar rise and increasing stem stack have different effects.

      You can model this is the rider/bike calculator.

      https://www.llbmtb.com/members/bike-setup/rider-and-bike-calculator/

      I hope that’s helpful,

      Lee

      Reply
  19. BillyHowse
    BillyHowse says:

    Hey Lee, went on my longest ride with the correct triangle and now I feel my quads, glutes and hamstrings all firing. Been riding MTB since 1987 or so and have never experienced this Pretty amazing the power I feel. Can’t wait to learn to jump and wheelie! WOOHOO!! ????

    Reply
  20. Eiriksmal
    Eiriksmal says:

    Lee, why do you think this kind of fear-mongering exists? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A7R0lobJNU

    I rode my wife’s new, medium (455 mm reach puts it right around the correct size for my 801mm RAD) Marin Wildcat around the cul-de-sac and that thing felt amazing. IT WAS SO EASY TO MANUAL, LEE! Marin and GMBN would have me ride a 470mm reach bike, instead, and tell me I’ll die in a fire if I choose anything smaller.

    My medium Reeb Sqweeb arrives tomorrow (460mm reach). I’m excited to brag to my riding buddies about your philosophies. Who cares that I’m 6’1″ and riding a “medium”? I want to hop and flick and skid!

    Reply
    • Lee McCormack
      Lee McCormack says:

      Hi!!!

      Industry trends, man.

      1) Most of us are sheep. Once a message gets out there, it becomes truth.

      2) GMBN and most other media outlets depend on advertisers for their existence. They need to say what the bike companies want them to say. You can see Blake trying to tell truth, but I feel like he was being careful.

      – What Doddy says about the smaller bike putting him rearward and forward is bullshit. That’s not the bike. It’s the rider.

      – What concerns me about videos like this: GMBN seems credible, and the productions are nice, so we’re inclined to trust the advice. But, man, some terrible advice is being dispensed. You need to think for yourself (when you read my stuff too).

      Reply
  21. Shakey
    Shakey says:

    Hi Lee,

    Thanks for providing such an awesome resource!

    I’ve been playing around with the numbers, and now a bit stuck in deciding if I should buy new bars, stem etc.. or a new frame 🙁

    My medium Scott Genius 930 (set up as 29er) has a reach of 439.1, and I just don’t know if I can make it work as the bar setback looks like it needs to go negative for my RAD of 780mm (measured).

    Any thoughts that might help me move forward one way or another would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance,
    Joel

    Reply
  22. YannosWik
    YannosWik says:

    Hi Lee,

    Getting an evil wreckoning v3 frame and would really appreciate your thoughts on size 🙂

    I have a commencal meta hardtail that seems to fit me pretty good. Standing on the pedals between two chairs in riding shoes, top of deadlift stance – middle finger knuckle is just above the centerline of the grip. When I hold the grips tightly I can feel my shoulders being pulled down a little so maybe a touch short?

    Measured RAD with a broom stick (and a level attached to it to make sure it’s straight) is consistently 86.4 – 86.3 on repeated measurements. Could not simulate heal drop as I was standing on a flat surface in riding shoes. Should be lower with heal drop I guess.

    When I plug the numbers of that bike in the tool it gives a RAD of 85.0mm. A M Wreckoning frame has the same BB to top of headtube measurement (doing the calcs from reach and stack). As you’d expect, when plugged into the tool, to get the same RAD I’d have to use the exact same bar, stem (40mm, 0 angle) and spacers (45mm half stack). Plugging in the L frame with the same bar but a 32mm stem (+5 angle) and less spacers/lower headset (33mm half stack) gives a RAD of 86.0mm (85.7mm with the stem upside down at -5).

    Feels like my current bike and the M wreckoning would have me at slight RAD minus, while the L could be closer to a neutral RAD. What do you think? Better to go with all the smaller frame 40mm stem and 46mm half stack, or the L with a 32mm stem and 33mm half stack?

    Thank you for the immense help so far! Hope you have time to share your thoughts on this 🙂
    Yannos

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *